Service: Omega Geneve calibre 684

The calibre 684 is the flagship of small Omega movements. It’s automatic, and has a date.

Stephen sent this one in, and it needs a new crystal and a service.

Ouch! The back gasket is badly dissolved, and there is quite a bit of cleaning up to do.

The movement beat is so feeble that the timegrapher can’t pick it up properly.

Gunk everywhere.

Quite a feat to squeeze an auto winder into a movement this size.

Taking the movement apart.

The date wheel has its own individual assembly, which is very nice.

Quite a few parts in that movement.

The parts have arrived and I can put the movement back together.

A first adjustment after putting the top plate together.

The movement looks nice and clean.

Dial and hands go back on.

The movement goes into the case, and now I can put the rotor back on. I’ve cleaned the case, and it’s ready for a new gasket.

With a new crystal, the watch is back to what it should look like!

14 thoughts on “Service: Omega Geneve calibre 684

  1. Hi Christian, just received my Omega Geneve (anniversary gift), WOW I absolutely love it and to see the amount of work that went into servicing and cleaning it is just simply amazing.
    I think your blog is a great record of your obvious love of watches and talent,
    thanks so much for sharing it and allowing us all an insight into how these beautiful watches work.

  2. Hi Christian
    Thanks again for the repair and the blog really is a feather in your cap, in my opinion.
    That was a dirty watch, bit surprised as it looked reasonable to the eye.

    Mat I ask where I can find reliable info on how to find info on the timographer readings, just looking for a general overview if that’s possible.

    I am sure my wife will appreciate your hard work with the watch.

  3. I have seen many of your services . All of them are very perfect. As long as I follow your blog I have seen, when you service a watch you also change the mainspring, and I have some questions about how often that we should change our mainspring ? 5 or 10 or 3 years ?

    • I change the mainspring when I service a watch, as it doesn’t make any sense not to change it, only to find out that it’s too weak. As they are relatively cheap, it’s like changing gaskets.

      On the other hand, I sometimes leave original mainsprings in vintage watches, as you can’t get them any more and they form part of the history of the watch. Even 50 year old mainsprings can still provide good service.

      So you see it’s a bit of a mixed bag, and I can’t claim that it’s a necessity to change them at every service. More of a precaution.

  4. Christian, you have become the defacto Omega watch service centre! You soon will be able to do these with your eyes closed. 🙂

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